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Dealing with dogs

  • Posted:
    Ok folks .... I do a lot of road running but love going off on the trail, canal, park etc too ... Only problem is I really hate dogs.  Whenever I see them off the lead, it really gets my anxiety going and I stop running & start walking.  If a dog jumps up on me then "game's a bogey"
    
    I know it's irrational.  Any tips for dealing with excitable dogs (and careless owners) when out running?
    
    Cheers 
     
    Ok folks .... I do a lot of road running but love going off on the trail, canal, park etc too ... Only problem is I really hate dogs.  Whenever I see them off the lead, it really gets my anxiety going and I stop running & start walking.  If a dog jumps up on me then "game's a bogey"
    
    I know it's irrational.  Any tips for dealing with excitable dogs (and careless owners) when out running?
    
    Cheers
    Report
  • avatar
    Next Stop Sub 3hours
    Posted:
    The ones on leads are the real pain as the owner let's them wander so turning it into a trip wire!
    
    A find a wide a berth as possible usually works! 
     
    The ones on leads are the real pain as the owner let's them wander so turning it into a trip wire!
    
    A find a wide a berth as possible usually works!
    Report
  • avatar
    Posted:
    It's probably best to run the other way and avoid any potential confrontation.
    
    This does seem to be an increasingly common problem where I live though.  I usually just carry on running and if the dog comes anywhere near me I tell the owner firmly to "CONTROL YOUR DOG PLEASE" as I go past. 
     
    It's probably best to run the other way and avoid any potential confrontation.
    
    This does seem to be an increasingly common problem where I live though.  I usually just carry on running and if the dog comes anywhere near me I tell the owner firmly to "CONTROL YOUR DOG PLEASE" as I go past.
    Report
  • avatar
    no excuses
    Posted:
    Best bet would be to slow right down to a walk past every dog. Fast moving people and objects can switch on a dogs prey drive, its a natural instinct and some dogs have bundles of it others none. Training should make this controllable but 1. the dog might be very young and excitable, 2. not all owners bother training their dogs. 3. Past negative experiences of runners or people can cause an aggressive reaction. 
    
    I bet you've all been angry at a cycling suddenly coming out of now where and startling or just missing you, well suddenly running past a dog can have the same effect and some dogs can react by biting the next time. If a dog runs up to you and even jumps on you do not kick it or shout just stand still wait for the owner to get the dog again. If you keep running, as far as I'm concerned, you are more likely to get bitten either from the dog going into prey drive and nipping you or getting over excited and again nipping you. Kicking might work this time at creating the distance between you and the dog but what happens next time he sees you or another runner. The dog will just view all runners as things that hurt it when they went to say hello creating a negative association and the potential of a dog bite.
    
    Yes you shouldn't have to slow down but if it means you don't get bitten I know what I'd do :)
    
    PS. I teach dogs how to bite and rehabilitate dogs with behavioural issues and have a BSc in Animal Behaviour and FdSC in Canine Behaviour. 
     
    Best bet would be to slow right down to a walk past every dog. Fast moving people and objects can switch on a dogs prey drive, its a natural instinct and some dogs have bundles of it others none. Training should make this controllable but 1. the dog might be very young and excitable, 2. not all owners bother training their dogs. 3. Past negative experiences of runners or people can cause an aggressive reaction. 
    
    I bet you've all been angry at a cycling suddenly coming out of now where and startling or just missing you, well suddenly running past a dog can have the same effect and some dogs can react by biting the next time. If a dog runs up to you and even jumps on you do not kick it or shout just stand still wait for the owner to get the dog again. If you keep running, as far as I'm concerned, you are more likely to get bitten either from the dog going into prey drive and nipping you or getting over excited and again nipping you. Kicking might work this time at creating the distance between you and the dog but what happens next time he sees you or another runner. The dog will just view all runners as things that hurt it when they went to say hello creating a negative association and the potential of a dog bite.
    
    Yes you shouldn't have to slow down but if it means you don't get bitten I know what I'd do :)
    
    PS. I teach dogs how to bite and rehabilitate dogs with behavioural issues and have a BSc in Animal Behaviour and FdSC in Canine Behaviour.
    Report
  • avatar
    @paulfromwire on twitter
    Posted:
    I remember running round Worcester racecourse approaching 2 Jack Russels 'having a mad half hour' coming towards me. One hurdle of the pair later & all good. 
    [signature]http://runkeeper.com/user/PaulNeill/profile 
    I remember running round Worcester racecourse approaching 2 Jack Russels 'having a mad half hour' coming towards me. One hurdle of the pair later & all good.
    Report
  • Posted:
    Being afraid of animals is normal. One thing that may help is to learn to recognise the dogs mood. Observe the dogs tail and ears, they often tell well if the dog is just happy to see you or if it is considering you a threat to it.
    
    Wagging tail and relaxed ears are often signs of happiness, while stiff tail and alert ears means the dog is not fully relaxed.
    
    If you are unsure about the dog, it's always better to walk by rather than run and ignore the animal. Long eye contact is not good idea either.
    
    I hope you overcome your fears. Most dogs are nice and owners with mad dogs rarely keep them free. 
     
    Being afraid of animals is normal. One thing that may help is to learn to recognise the dogs mood. Observe the dogs tail and ears, they often tell well if the dog is just happy to see you or if it is considering you a threat to it.
    
    Wagging tail and relaxed ears are often signs of happiness, while stiff tail and alert ears means the dog is not fully relaxed.
    
    If you are unsure about the dog, it's always better to walk by rather than run and ignore the animal. Long eye contact is not good idea either.
    
    I hope you overcome your fears. Most dogs are nice and owners with mad dogs rarely keep them free.
    Report
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